Hour of Code

hour-of-code-logoGot an Hour? Code Away!

In this age of technology and innovation, our daily activities have become heavily dependent upon electronic devices and machines, such as computers, smartphones, tablets, advanced automobiles, airplanes, space shuttles and so on. Without machines, we would not be able to create a better quality of life and find solutions to real-life problems. Computer programming, or coding, plays a significant role in making our day-to-day devices function. Coding make it possible for us to create computer software, mobile applications, websites, automobile interface and cyber security platforms. Coding is an excellent way to learn about critical thinking and step-by-step logical thought processing, and to teach kids about how to make their devices and machines work!

Since 2012, Hour of Code has become a global movement to promote the importance of coding among kids and adults. Well-known celebrities such as Ashton Kutcher and Jessica Alba, tech leaders Sheryl Sandberg, Bill Gates and Jack Dorsey, and even world leaders such as President Barack Obama have joined this spectacular initiative to create awareness regarding the exciting world of computer programming. Currently, there are 146,275 Hour of Code events across the globe.

With over 200 tutorials and lesson plans, Hour of Code provides resources for teachers to incorporate coding into their classrooms, ongoing STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) programs, robotics clubs and much more. Available in over 45 languages and compatible with all electronic devices, Hour of Code allows anyone, including students, teachers and parents, to pick a grade level, topic, activity or language, and learn the basics of coding in a fun, interactive and easy way!

Learn more about Hour of Code and its impact here and visit Hour of Code to start coding right away!

Warm Up with this Tomato Soup Recipe

By Alex Phares, EFNEP Extension Associate

Summer seemed to hang on well into the fall months this year, but by December winter temps finally hit the Mountain State and early January is bringing about our first accumulating snow. It’s the perfect time of year to warm yourself with a hot bowl of homemade soup, and one of my favorites is good ol’ tomato soup.

This recipe is adapted from the Runner’s World Cook Book 2013 and is a healthy, delicious remake of classic tomato soup that adds chickpeas. Chickpeas are a great source of fiber and protein, and tomatoes are full of cancer-fighting antioxidants. To round out the meal, try topping with a tablespoon of cheese and serve with a side salad.

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 can (28 ounces) fire-roasted crushed tomatoes
2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 can (15 ounces) chickpeas

  1. Heat the oil in a large soup pot over medium heat.
  2. Add the onion and cook until soft, around 4 minutes (stirring frequently).
  3. Add the garlic and cook for about 30 seconds.
  4. Add the tomatoes and broth, raise heat and bring to a boil.
  5. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 5 minutes. Add sugar and black pepper.
  6. Add the chickpeas and simmer for 10 minutes.
  7. Carefully transfer to a blender (work in small batches, or the steam will build up in the blender. Only fill 1/2 – 2/3 of the way full).
  8. Blend ½ of the soup until mostly smooth, you may see bits of tomato and chickpea.
  9. Return to remaining soup in the pot and serve.

2017 New Year Resolutions

As the new year approaches, we begin to look to what 2017 may bring us. After asking our Extension agents what are their New Year’s Resolutions, these were some of their answers.

Kelli Batch, Assistant Program Director – My New Year’s Resolution is to be more sociable in my personal life, as well as more active in my community.

Brad Cochran, Extension Agent – My New Year’s Resolution for 2017 is to be a better husband, father, friend, neighbor and person than in 2016. Losing weight and getting healthier would be nice, too!

Christine Kinder, Extension Agent – My resolutions are to manage time more wisely in all aspects of my life, and take “staycations.” There are places I’ve not traveled to in West Virginia, and I look forward to exploring them!

Ray Moeller, Extension Agent – I don’t technically do resolutions; however, here are a few things I will try to bring into the next year: (1) Be more open and less afraid to ask (even really hard) questions. (2) Take a deep breath when the pressure mounts. (3) Be in meaningful touch with my grandkids at least weekly.

Alex Phares, Extension Associate – My resolutions are to be better about strength training, to read through the Bible by 2018, and to save up for a trip to go somewhere new!

Tabitha Surface, Extension Agent – I don’t usually do New Year’s Resolutions, but one year I had a friend set mine and his were so much more fun and interesting than what I would have assigned myself, so I’ll probably try that again. I’m also going to try to live a more balanced life; I get overly focused on work, usually it is work, and take too much away from personal goals and self-care.

Chris Zeto, Extension Agent – My New Year’s resolution for this coming year is to travel more. Life is about seeing and experiencing new things, and traveling assures them both. Traveling is a wonderful way for friends and family to grow closer together.

Holiday Traditions

This year we decided to ask some of our Extension agents what their favorite holiday traditions were. Below are their answers.

Matt Browning, Director of Communications – My holiday tradition is to redvelvetcheesecakemake a cheesecake for my family’s Christmas Eve celebration, and I’ve been toying with various recipes for about 10 years. I’ve long been a fan of the red velvet cheesecake at Cheesecake Factory, so a few years ago I concocted my own version by combining a few different recipes. I use these Southern Red Velvet Cake and Cream Cheese Frosting recipes from Food Network and my go-to New York Cheesecake recipe from Kraft (sans the crust and the pie filling). I make each recipe individually (usually doubling the frosting one), slice the cakes horizontally, stack them (alternating layers), and then frost. It’s a bit time-consuming but extremely delicious!

Bonnie Dunn, Extension Specialist – Christmas Eve candle light formal dinner with the family and friends. This is how my children learned their proper dining manners that prepared them for their future place in life. The menu has always been the same — Appetizer: Shrimp cocktail and cheese ball. Dinner: beef tenderloin, baked potato, green beans, salad, homemade rolls, fruit salad. Dessert: pumpkin pie, old-fashioned sugar cream pie, lemon cheese pie and a variety of homemade cookies, iced tea and sparkling cider (non-alcoholic) in champagne flutes. We continue to do this but have had to modify a little as the circle of family and friends has increased.

Stacy Ford, Extension Agent – We always celebrate Christmas on Christmas Eve, so we relax on Christmas day and watch the A Christmas Story movie marathon! Also, my family collects Christmas ornaments, mainly Hallmark, so it’s always fun to get them out and see the ones on my Mom’s tree, too.

Stacy Herrick, Communications Specialist – One of my favorite things to do to eatnparkchristmasstar750kick off the holiday season is to watch the Eat’n Park Christmas Star commercial. I grew up just south of Pittsburgh, and you always knew it was Christmastime when it came on TV.

Kaysha Moreno, Extension Agent – My favorite holiday tradition is being able to sit around with family drinking hot cocoa and watching Christmas movies. Oftentimes, we get so wrapped up in obtaining and giving gifts that we miss the true feeling of peace and love that Christmas brings.

Paper Chains: A New Twist on an Old Classic

By Tabitha Surface, Extension Agent

There aren’t many of us who haven’t made paper chains as kids whether that was to decorate a Christmas tree or classroom or count down to a very important date. This year, my family is bringing back the tradition but with a few updates, which means these decorations don’t just have to be for the holidays.

Fbook-paper-chainirst, the paper chain. Instead of using craft paper, try making the paper chain from old books. If you are doing this with your kids, see which of their books they’ve outgrown but that are also too beat up to be donated. If you don’t have books, you can always buy them on the cheap and around a theme. For instance, book stores often have comic books for a buck and thrift stores are great places to find old favorites or books of sheet music.

rags-chainThe next chain is my mother’s innovation. Using nothing but old sheets and paper towel rolls, you can have a very rustic chic chain. First, cut the paper towel rolls into 1 inch rings. Then, cut strips of fabric about ½ inch wide. Wrap one end of the fabric around the ring and tie it off. Then, continue wrapping until the ring is covered. If you run out of material, just tie another strip on. When the ring is covered, tie it off again but leave a slightly longer tail. That tail will tie to the next ring you cover. Attach as many rings as you’d like. You can opt to use similar colors and patterns or be very eclectic. Once it’s done, drape your chain around a tree or wrap it with lights and decorate a door.

The best part is that you can enjoy time with your family while you craft. Plus, these chains, unlike the popcorn you might string, can last for more than a single year. Happy holidays!

The Canning Couple: Turkey Stock

In our recent Getting-Started Guide to Canning post, we introduced Matt and Marsha Wood, our very own “Canning Couple.” In this post, Matt and Marsha use their holiday leftovers to make turkey stock.

By Matt Wood, Data Network Manager

Cleaning up after the family Thanksgiving get-together, my sister-in-law got onto Marsha about the turkey and bones that she was just going to throw away. I suggested turkey stock in the pressure cooker. Marsha looked up a recipe for turkey stock on the Internet, but doesn’t remember the site she found it on. It called for bay leaves, salt and pepper with carrots onions and celery, and enough water to cover the bones. I later found Pressure Cooker Diaries with general directions.

What we used

  • Pressure canner
  • Turkey bones
  • Celery, carrots and an onion
  • Salt, Pepper, Poultry seasoning
  • 7 quart jars, 6 ½ pint jars, zipper freezer bags
  • New lids and bands

Making the stock

  1. Cut up 4 stalks of celery, 6 baby carrots and 1 onion into a 22-quart pressure canner.
  2. Place turkey bones with a little meat into the pressure cooker.
  3. About 1 tablespoon each of poultry seasoning, salt and pepper. We didn’t have any bay leaves.
  4. I added 14 quarts of water – enough to cover the bones by 2 inches. ( I did not think about breaking up the bones as it is a 22 quart pressure canner!)
  5. Close and lock the lid.
  6. 12-quarts-stock-jpgHeat the pressure canner until steam starts to escape from the regulator vent. This took over an hour because of the amount of liquid.
  7. Once the weight giggled I checked and the pressure was 15 pounds per square inch (PSI). Lower heat to just maintain 15 PSI.
  8. Process for 45 minutes.
  9. Remove from heat, let pressure cooker cool. This took several hours.
  10. Once cooled, remove the bones, then strain.
  11. I brought the stock back to a boil adding some additional poultry seasoning and salt.

Can the stock

  1. Please see previous posts and the National Center for Home Food Preservation for complete canning directions.
  2. Wash pressure cooker, jars, rings and new lids. Preheat jars and lids.
  3. Fill jars with stock within 1 inch of the top of the jars.
  4. Place bottom plate and 4 cups of water in pressure canner.
  5. canned-turkey-stockPlace 7 quarts in bottom of canner, Then insert spacer, place ½ pint jars in canner.
  6. Lock lid on canner.
  7. Heat on high until weight giggles and pressure is at 15 PSI, reduce heat process for 25 minutes.
  8. At end of processing time, remove from heat and let the canner cool.
  9. Once pressure reaches 0 and the canner is cool, unlock and open the lid.
  10. Remove the jars from the pressure canner using a jar lifter and place upright on a towel, allowing to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours.

I did get a bunch of jars of stock. I also put some of the stock (5 or 6 quarts) into freezer bags, laid them flat on cookie sheets and put them in the freezer.

frozen-turkey-stock

I had about a quart left that I made turkey and dumplings by substituting turkey for chicken in Paula Deen’s recipe.

Turkey Talk: The Ins and Outs

By Bonnie Dunn, Tabitha Surface and Robin Turner, Extension Agents

Thanksgiving is a time for good food and drink with family and friends, but the common centerpiece of the holiday dinner – especially Thanksgiving – is turkey. And while delicious, turkey does have its own set of preparation steps that must be carefully followed to ensure it is cooked appropriately. Here are a few guidelines that will ensure all your guests remain happy and healthy during your “turkey day” festivities.

Thawing: There are a few ways to thaw a turkey, but the best is to thaw it in the refrigerator. This will allow the turkey to thaw at the proper temperature, which also slows the growth of harmful bacteria. If you must use water to thaw your turkey, make sure the water is cold and drain it frequently to maintain the cold temperature.

Next, remember the letters “CSCS!” when the real turkey prep begins: Clean – Separate – Cook – Clean Up.

Clean: Wash hands, utensils, surfaces, and fruits and vegetables. Do not wash the turkey or eggs.

Separate: Keep all the meats separated from other food items by using separate cutting boards, utensils and towels. Wash your hands when switching from one utensil or recipe to another. Keep a sink full of clean, soapy, hot water to wash your hands as you are preparing each recipe. This ensures that no cross contamination occurs.

Cook: Yay! It is time to put the turkey in the oven. Try these helpful hints for a safe, delicious holiday!

  1. For a quick clean-up, purchase a turkey cooking bag at your local grocery store. This not only saves time on cleaning but also makes for a more moist and flavorful dinner.
  2. When stuffing is cooked inside the turkey, it is more moist and flavorful, but it absorbs some of the fat from the bird, so keep that in mind when calculating your caloric intake.
  3. Stuffing can be a source of foodborne illness, especially if placed inside the bird. Make sure all cutting boards, spoons, bowls and hands are very clean when preparing the mixture. Never stuff the bird before you are ready to bake it. Do not pack the cavity tight as the center may stay at the “temperature danger zone” too long.
  4. Baking stuffing separately from the turkey is safer and produces a lower-calorie side dish. If the stuffing is made early in the day, mix it very quickly and place in a prepared baking dish. Cover tightly and refrigerate immediately. When ready to bake, remove it from refrigerator and place directly into the preheated oven. Test to make sure the stuffing has heated all the way through before serving

 Clean up: Do not leave your Thanksgiving dinner out on the table beyond two hours after having taken it from the oven/stovetop to the table.

If you want to cook your turkey unstuffed, add extra flavor by placing the following items in the cavity of the turkey: one celery rib, one onion cut in half, and one whole carrot. Otherwise, try our Healthy Holiday Stuffing recipe below.

 

Healthy Holiday Stuffing:
Serves 8

Ingredients
1/2 cup chopped carrots
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 1/2 cup de-fatted turkey broth or 1 cup low-sodium non-fat chicken broth
1 cup sliced raw mushrooms
1 8-oz. package of seasoned stuffing mix
Non-stick cooking spray

Directions

  1. Wash, peel and finely chop carrots, celery and onion. Place in a medium saucepan with broth and bring to a boil. Cover, turn heat down and simmer for 5 minutes.
  1. Slice mushrooms. Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Remove from heat briefly and spray with non-stick cooking spray. Return to heat and add mushrooms to saute.
  1. Place stuffing mix in large bowl. Add mushrooms and vegetables in broth. Toss lightly with a fork.
  1. Spray baking dish lightly with cooking spray. Spoon stuffing into baking dish. Cover tightly with foil. Bake at 325 degrees.
  1. If you choose to stuff your turkey, be sure to do it loosely.

Nutritional Values
Calories: 120
Sodium: 387 mg
Carbs: 25 g
Protein: 4 g
Fat: 1 g

Exchanges:
1 starch/bread and
1 vegetable

 

For additional information refer to: CDC Thanksgiving Food Safety

 

 

 

Cyber Monday

By Stacy Herrick, Communications Specialist

In our third, and last, installment of “Thrifty Thursdays,” we are going to talk about Cyber Monday shopping tips. The term “Cyber Monday” was coined in 2005 as a reference to the Monday after Thanksgiving, where marketing companies were trying to sway people to shop online. This year, the online shopping event will take place on Monday, November 28. Below are some tips to help you get the most out of your shopping.

Do Your Homework
Most sites will release their ads a few days in advance, so take a look to see who is offering what and make a game plan. Also, let the deal bloggers do the work for you. Find a site or two to browse and you can save yourself tons of time. They will have the latest on promo codes, pricing and even some unadvertised offers.

Plan Ahead
If you know where you are planning to shop ahead of time (which you should, because you already scouted the ads, right?), take a few minutes ahead of time to create a customer account if you don’t already have one. This will save you time during checkout and will help you move on to the next site, and sale, quicker.

Stretch Your Dollar
Everyone loves to get more bang for their buck. One way to do this is to purchase discounted gift cards ahead of time for stores that you plan on shopping at. Another way to do this is to order through a rewards site to earn points or cash back. Or, if you are feeling generous and are shopping on Amazon, use Amazon Smile to have a portion of your purchase donated to a charity of your choice.

Be Quick on the Draw
Some sales only have a limited quantity of items or are only on sale for a certain amount of time. Be aware of this and plan to hit these sales early in day (or whatever time the sale starts) so you don’t miss out. Amazon offers early access to most of its Lightning Deals to Prime Members.

Beware of Shipping
There’s nothing like thinking you’re getting a great deal on your items only to find out when you go to checkout that the shipping is almost as much as your items. Make sure you are aware of the site’s shipping costs before you spend time shopping. There are some sites out there that will gather information for you on who has free shipping (thank you deal bloggers!). Another option to consider is to ship the items directly to the recipient. This will save you from having to travel with additional items. This is an especially good idea if you are flying for the holidays!

Be Safe
As always, when shopping online, make sure your computer is up to date with the latest anti-virus software and is protected from anti-spyware. Shopping on trustworthy sites is always the best way to ensure your personal information will be handled safely. To ensure your online purchase is secure, before paying, look in the address box for the “s” in https:// and in the lower-right corner for the lock symbol. Paying with credit cards or PayPal are often easiest when shopping online because, if something does happen, it is always possible to dispute unauthorized charges.

Hopefully these tips have helped you prepare for your holiday shopping. Good luck out there!

Nov. 17: Annual Take a Hike Day

By Ray Moeller, CARD Extension Agent

This Thursday, Nov. 17, marks national “Take a Hike” Day. Below are two not-so-well-known hikes that I often enjoy in southern West Virginia.

Long Point on Summersville Lake
This trail meanders through mature forest growth, leading to a rock outcropping that is 40 feet high at a sharp bend in the Gauley River, which becomes part of Summersville Lake during the summer months. The hike is between one and one-half miles and two miles one-way and there are several off trail options. There is little chance of becoming turned around as the hike traverses a point which is defined on both sides by Summersville Lake itself. To find the trail, drive on U.S. Route 19 south of Summersville and turn west onto Airport Road, which leads to the marina and Mountain Lake Campground. Drive on Airport Road past the marina road, the campground store and the airport. When you come to a gate, park along the roadway and follow the two tracks to the trail signs. The view from the point is terrific, just be aware that children will require careful oversight as there are no hand rails or fencing.

The Falls of Hills Creek
This trail is a hidden gem in the Gauley District of the Monongahela National Forest. Travel east out of Richwood on Highway 55/39 for approximately 20 miles to the marked parking area at the Falls of Hills Creek. The trail leads alongside three falls that are increasing in height. Be warned that the trail is downhill to the last of the falls with many stairs to negotiate. Thus the hiker will be required to return uphill along the same stairs and incline. The falls are particularly beautiful in times of more significant rainfall, especially in the spring of the year, when flowers brighten the landscape and the new growth allows for enhanced sight lines. The total distance is approximately three-quarters of a mile one way, of which the first 1,700 feet paved, with the remainder of the trail more strenuous.

 

Black Friday 2016

By Stacy Herrick, Communications Specialist

Black Friday has become, in a sense, a holiday of its own. Love it or hate it, one thing is for sure: it is the unofficial kickoff to the holiday season. With sales everywhere you turn, why not take an opportunity to save yourself some cash while buying gifts for your loved ones?

Show Your Loyalty
Joining a store’s loyalty program can get you special deals, sneak peeks, extra coupons or earn you store cash. Make sure you sign up for these loyalty programs before you head out for your Black Friday shopping.

Sign Up Early for Store Emails
Once you know where you plan on shopping, sign up for store emails a couple of weeks in advance (like, now!) to start receiving their special discounts. Often, stores will send a special coupon to customers for signing up to receive their emails. (Don’t forget, you can always unsubscribe from these later if you don’t want to continue getting them.)

Become a Follower
Just like signing up for store emails, another great way to stay up to date with the latest news, products and sales is to follow the company on social media. It is not uncommon for stores to offer exclusive sales to their social media followers, so keep your eyes peeled!

Consider Shopping with Gift Cards
If you know which stores you will be shopping at this holiday season, why not buy gift cards ahead of time to make your purchases with? Depending on where you buy your gift cards, you can rack up fuel rewards or even get them at a discounted price from sites like Raise.com. When combined with Black Friday prices, the savings really add up! (Plus, this will also help you stay within your budget because you’ll be more aware of how much you are spending.)

If you do purchase gift cards to shop with, consider using an app like Gyft so you can leave the bulky cards at home. Gyft not only stores your gift cards on your phone for you, but it also keeps an updated account of what is left on the card as you make your purchases.

Door Busters
Some stores offer guarantees for Door Buster sales during a certain period of time on Black Friday. This means that even though they may have sold out of the actual item, you can purchase a voucher at the advertised price during the block of time and will be able to pick up that item before Christmas once it is in stock again.

Also, it is worth noting that just about all of the sales offered in-store are also offered online, with the exception of Door Busters.

These are just a few shopping tips that I’ve found that help me. Do you have any other tips you’d like to share? If so, comment below! May your cart always be full and your checkout lines be short. Good luck!

Not interested in fighting the crowds on Black Friday? Maybe online shopping in your pajamas is more your speed? Check back next week for Cyber Monday shopping tips.