Huntington Students Reap Benefits of School Garden

IMG_3529Students at Spring Hill Elementary School in Huntington have more access to fresh fruits and vegetables thanks to a school garden developed through WVSU Extension Service’s SCRATCH Project. SCRATCH, or Sustainable Community Revitalization in Appalachia Through Children’s Hands, teaches youth about agriculture and entrepreneurship through hands-on instruction in gardening and business management, leading to the creation of young “agri-preneurs.”

“SCRATCH has made a significant impact at Spring Hill Elementary, highlighting the positive outcome that gardening has on our students,” says Sara Barraclough, technology integration specialist at Spring Hill Elementary School. “Our SCRATCH partners have been diligent in their efforts to assist Spring Hill Elementary as we work to provide students with the unique opportunities that school gardening has to offer.”

Those opportunities have proven fruitful at the school. Using the innovative Junior Master Gardener curriculum, students have gained hands-on experience in garden management that is also impacting staff, who are not only recognizing the effects gardening has on changing students’ relationships with food but are also incorporating sustainable practices into school operations.

“Many students that have been working with SCRATCH for several years are leaders in the school-wide gardening project that we are developing,” Barraclough says. “One of our third-graders was inspired to create a compost for the garden so that we can reduce food waste in the cafeteria.”

IMG_3549Through donations and community support, organizers have expanded existing garden beds; built a terraced garden with space for each Spring Hill classroom; and purchased seeds, student-friendly garden tools, and equipment for food preparation and storage.

Now, thanks to a $10,000 grant from Seeds of Change, Spring Hill Elementary School’s garden will become an even stronger sustainable resource of fresh fruits and vegetables for students in the food desert community of Huntington.

“We look forward to continuing the work that SCRATCH has upstarted here and to fostering our relationship with the amazing individuals that have supported and encouraged us along the way,” Barraclough says.

To learn how you can support the SCRATCH Project, visit scratchproject.org.

(Photos by Sara Barraclough)

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