Family & Consumer Sciences

Warm Up with this Tomato Soup Recipe

By Alex Phares, EFNEP Extension Associate

Summer seemed to hang on well into the fall months this year, but by December winter temps finally hit the Mountain State and early January is bringing about our first accumulating snow. It’s the perfect time of year to warm yourself with a hot bowl of homemade soup, and one of my favorites is good ol’ tomato soup.

This recipe is adapted from the Runner’s World Cook Book 2013 and is a healthy, delicious remake of classic tomato soup that adds chickpeas. Chickpeas are a great source of fiber and protein, and tomatoes are full of cancer-fighting antioxidants. To round out the meal, try topping with a tablespoon of cheese and serve with a side salad.

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 can (28 ounces) fire-roasted crushed tomatoes
2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 can (15 ounces) chickpeas

  1. Heat the oil in a large soup pot over medium heat.
  2. Add the onion and cook until soft, around 4 minutes (stirring frequently).
  3. Add the garlic and cook for about 30 seconds.
  4. Add the tomatoes and broth, raise heat and bring to a boil.
  5. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 5 minutes. Add sugar and black pepper.
  6. Add the chickpeas and simmer for 10 minutes.
  7. Carefully transfer to a blender (work in small batches, or the steam will build up in the blender. Only fill 1/2 – 2/3 of the way full).
  8. Blend ½ of the soup until mostly smooth, you may see bits of tomato and chickpea.
  9. Return to remaining soup in the pot and serve.

The Canning Couple: Turkey Stock

In our recent Getting-Started Guide to Canning post, we introduced Matt and Marsha Wood, our very own “Canning Couple.” In this post, Matt and Marsha use their holiday leftovers to make turkey stock.

By Matt Wood, Data Network Manager

Cleaning up after the family Thanksgiving get-together, my sister-in-law got onto Marsha about the turkey and bones that she was just going to throw away. I suggested turkey stock in the pressure cooker. Marsha looked up a recipe for turkey stock on the Internet, but doesn’t remember the site she found it on. It called for bay leaves, salt and pepper with carrots onions and celery, and enough water to cover the bones. I later found Pressure Cooker Diaries with general directions.

What we used

  • Pressure canner
  • Turkey bones
  • Celery, carrots and an onion
  • Salt, Pepper, Poultry seasoning
  • 7 quart jars, 6 ½ pint jars, zipper freezer bags
  • New lids and bands

Making the stock

  1. Cut up 4 stalks of celery, 6 baby carrots and 1 onion into a 22-quart pressure canner.
  2. Place turkey bones with a little meat into the pressure cooker.
  3. About 1 tablespoon each of poultry seasoning, salt and pepper. We didn’t have any bay leaves.
  4. I added 14 quarts of water – enough to cover the bones by 2 inches. ( I did not think about breaking up the bones as it is a 22 quart pressure canner!)
  5. Close and lock the lid.
  6. 12-quarts-stock-jpgHeat the pressure canner until steam starts to escape from the regulator vent. This took over an hour because of the amount of liquid.
  7. Once the weight giggled I checked and the pressure was 15 pounds per square inch (PSI). Lower heat to just maintain 15 PSI.
  8. Process for 45 minutes.
  9. Remove from heat, let pressure cooker cool. This took several hours.
  10. Once cooled, remove the bones, then strain.
  11. I brought the stock back to a boil adding some additional poultry seasoning and salt.

Can the stock

  1. Please see previous posts and the National Center for Home Food Preservation for complete canning directions.
  2. Wash pressure cooker, jars, rings and new lids. Preheat jars and lids.
  3. Fill jars with stock within 1 inch of the top of the jars.
  4. Place bottom plate and 4 cups of water in pressure canner.
  5. canned-turkey-stockPlace 7 quarts in bottom of canner, Then insert spacer, place ½ pint jars in canner.
  6. Lock lid on canner.
  7. Heat on high until weight giggles and pressure is at 15 PSI, reduce heat process for 25 minutes.
  8. At end of processing time, remove from heat and let the canner cool.
  9. Once pressure reaches 0 and the canner is cool, unlock and open the lid.
  10. Remove the jars from the pressure canner using a jar lifter and place upright on a towel, allowing to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours.

I did get a bunch of jars of stock. I also put some of the stock (5 or 6 quarts) into freezer bags, laid them flat on cookie sheets and put them in the freezer.

frozen-turkey-stock

I had about a quart left that I made turkey and dumplings by substituting turkey for chicken in Paula Deen’s recipe.

Turkey Talk: The Ins and Outs

By Bonnie Dunn, Tabitha Surface and Robin Turner, Extension Agents

Thanksgiving is a time for good food and drink with family and friends, but the common centerpiece of the holiday dinner – especially Thanksgiving – is turkey. And while delicious, turkey does have its own set of preparation steps that must be carefully followed to ensure it is cooked appropriately. Here are a few guidelines that will ensure all your guests remain happy and healthy during your “turkey day” festivities.

Thawing: There are a few ways to thaw a turkey, but the best is to thaw it in the refrigerator. This will allow the turkey to thaw at the proper temperature, which also slows the growth of harmful bacteria. If you must use water to thaw your turkey, make sure the water is cold and drain it frequently to maintain the cold temperature.

Next, remember the letters “CSCS!” when the real turkey prep begins: Clean – Separate – Cook – Clean Up.

Clean: Wash hands, utensils, surfaces, and fruits and vegetables. Do not wash the turkey or eggs.

Separate: Keep all the meats separated from other food items by using separate cutting boards, utensils and towels. Wash your hands when switching from one utensil or recipe to another. Keep a sink full of clean, soapy, hot water to wash your hands as you are preparing each recipe. This ensures that no cross contamination occurs.

Cook: Yay! It is time to put the turkey in the oven. Try these helpful hints for a safe, delicious holiday!

  1. For a quick clean-up, purchase a turkey cooking bag at your local grocery store. This not only saves time on cleaning but also makes for a more moist and flavorful dinner.
  2. When stuffing is cooked inside the turkey, it is more moist and flavorful, but it absorbs some of the fat from the bird, so keep that in mind when calculating your caloric intake.
  3. Stuffing can be a source of foodborne illness, especially if placed inside the bird. Make sure all cutting boards, spoons, bowls and hands are very clean when preparing the mixture. Never stuff the bird before you are ready to bake it. Do not pack the cavity tight as the center may stay at the “temperature danger zone” too long.
  4. Baking stuffing separately from the turkey is safer and produces a lower-calorie side dish. If the stuffing is made early in the day, mix it very quickly and place in a prepared baking dish. Cover tightly and refrigerate immediately. When ready to bake, remove it from refrigerator and place directly into the preheated oven. Test to make sure the stuffing has heated all the way through before serving

 Clean up: Do not leave your Thanksgiving dinner out on the table beyond two hours after having taken it from the oven/stovetop to the table.

If you want to cook your turkey unstuffed, add extra flavor by placing the following items in the cavity of the turkey: one celery rib, one onion cut in half, and one whole carrot. Otherwise, try our Healthy Holiday Stuffing recipe below.

 

Healthy Holiday Stuffing:
Serves 8

Ingredients
1/2 cup chopped carrots
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 1/2 cup de-fatted turkey broth or 1 cup low-sodium non-fat chicken broth
1 cup sliced raw mushrooms
1 8-oz. package of seasoned stuffing mix
Non-stick cooking spray

Directions

  1. Wash, peel and finely chop carrots, celery and onion. Place in a medium saucepan with broth and bring to a boil. Cover, turn heat down and simmer for 5 minutes.
  1. Slice mushrooms. Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Remove from heat briefly and spray with non-stick cooking spray. Return to heat and add mushrooms to saute.
  1. Place stuffing mix in large bowl. Add mushrooms and vegetables in broth. Toss lightly with a fork.
  1. Spray baking dish lightly with cooking spray. Spoon stuffing into baking dish. Cover tightly with foil. Bake at 325 degrees.
  1. If you choose to stuff your turkey, be sure to do it loosely.

Nutritional Values
Calories: 120
Sodium: 387 mg
Carbs: 25 g
Protein: 4 g
Fat: 1 g

Exchanges:
1 starch/bread and
1 vegetable

 

For additional information refer to: CDC Thanksgiving Food Safety

 

 

 

Cyber Monday

By Stacy Herrick, Communications Specialist

In our third, and last, installment of “Thrifty Thursdays,” we are going to talk about Cyber Monday shopping tips. The term “Cyber Monday” was coined in 2005 as a reference to the Monday after Thanksgiving, where marketing companies were trying to sway people to shop online. This year, the online shopping event will take place on Monday, November 28. Below are some tips to help you get the most out of your shopping.

Do Your Homework
Most sites will release their ads a few days in advance, so take a look to see who is offering what and make a game plan. Also, let the deal bloggers do the work for you. Find a site or two to browse and you can save yourself tons of time. They will have the latest on promo codes, pricing and even some unadvertised offers.

Plan Ahead
If you know where you are planning to shop ahead of time (which you should, because you already scouted the ads, right?), take a few minutes ahead of time to create a customer account if you don’t already have one. This will save you time during checkout and will help you move on to the next site, and sale, quicker.

Stretch Your Dollar
Everyone loves to get more bang for their buck. One way to do this is to purchase discounted gift cards ahead of time for stores that you plan on shopping at. Another way to do this is to order through a rewards site to earn points or cash back. Or, if you are feeling generous and are shopping on Amazon, use Amazon Smile to have a portion of your purchase donated to a charity of your choice.

Be Quick on the Draw
Some sales only have a limited quantity of items or are only on sale for a certain amount of time. Be aware of this and plan to hit these sales early in day (or whatever time the sale starts) so you don’t miss out. Amazon offers early access to most of its Lightning Deals to Prime Members.

Beware of Shipping
There’s nothing like thinking you’re getting a great deal on your items only to find out when you go to checkout that the shipping is almost as much as your items. Make sure you are aware of the site’s shipping costs before you spend time shopping. There are some sites out there that will gather information for you on who has free shipping (thank you deal bloggers!). Another option to consider is to ship the items directly to the recipient. This will save you from having to travel with additional items. This is an especially good idea if you are flying for the holidays!

Be Safe
As always, when shopping online, make sure your computer is up to date with the latest anti-virus software and is protected from anti-spyware. Shopping on trustworthy sites is always the best way to ensure your personal information will be handled safely. To ensure your online purchase is secure, before paying, look in the address box for the “s” in https:// and in the lower-right corner for the lock symbol. Paying with credit cards or PayPal are often easiest when shopping online because, if something does happen, it is always possible to dispute unauthorized charges.

Hopefully these tips have helped you prepare for your holiday shopping. Good luck out there!

Black Friday 2016

By Stacy Herrick, Communications Specialist

Black Friday has become, in a sense, a holiday of its own. Love it or hate it, one thing is for sure: it is the unofficial kickoff to the holiday season. With sales everywhere you turn, why not take an opportunity to save yourself some cash while buying gifts for your loved ones?

Show Your Loyalty
Joining a store’s loyalty program can get you special deals, sneak peeks, extra coupons or earn you store cash. Make sure you sign up for these loyalty programs before you head out for your Black Friday shopping.

Sign Up Early for Store Emails
Once you know where you plan on shopping, sign up for store emails a couple of weeks in advance (like, now!) to start receiving their special discounts. Often, stores will send a special coupon to customers for signing up to receive their emails. (Don’t forget, you can always unsubscribe from these later if you don’t want to continue getting them.)

Become a Follower
Just like signing up for store emails, another great way to stay up to date with the latest news, products and sales is to follow the company on social media. It is not uncommon for stores to offer exclusive sales to their social media followers, so keep your eyes peeled!

Consider Shopping with Gift Cards
If you know which stores you will be shopping at this holiday season, why not buy gift cards ahead of time to make your purchases with? Depending on where you buy your gift cards, you can rack up fuel rewards or even get them at a discounted price from sites like Raise.com. When combined with Black Friday prices, the savings really add up! (Plus, this will also help you stay within your budget because you’ll be more aware of how much you are spending.)

If you do purchase gift cards to shop with, consider using an app like Gyft so you can leave the bulky cards at home. Gyft not only stores your gift cards on your phone for you, but it also keeps an updated account of what is left on the card as you make your purchases.

Door Busters
Some stores offer guarantees for Door Buster sales during a certain period of time on Black Friday. This means that even though they may have sold out of the actual item, you can purchase a voucher at the advertised price during the block of time and will be able to pick up that item before Christmas once it is in stock again.

Also, it is worth noting that just about all of the sales offered in-store are also offered online, with the exception of Door Busters.

These are just a few shopping tips that I’ve found that help me. Do you have any other tips you’d like to share? If so, comment below! May your cart always be full and your checkout lines be short. Good luck!

Not interested in fighting the crowds on Black Friday? Maybe online shopping in your pajamas is more your speed? Check back next week for Cyber Monday shopping tips.

Holiday Savings

By Stacy Herrick, Communications Specialist

‘Tis the season to start shopping for the holidays. Even though it is well before Thanksgiving, it’s never too early to start getting organized and getting ahead of the game. (I started back in October; don’t judge me.) Below are some time- and money-saving tips to help you get started.

Make a List
There are plenty of apps out there that can help you keep track of your Christmas lists, but I find Google Docs to be the easiest, because I already use it a lot as is. Plus, I am able to access it on my computer or phone and share my list with my husband so we can make sure we don’t miss buying for anyone.

Getting the “Must Have” Item on Your List
When purchasing gifts in advance, sometimes you may come across a better deal closer to the holiday. As long as you’re still within the timeframe of returns, that’s not a problem. Not to mention, it can also give you the flexibility to shop around but still make sure you were able to snag that “got to have” item on your list.

An example of this would be wanting to buy one of the “must have” toys of the season, but you’re not sure if you’ll be able to find it on Black Friday or Cyber Monday when everyone else is looking for the same item. Don’t fret! All you have to do is buy the item ahead of time (noting the timeframe you have to return it) and then when Black Friday and Cyber Monday come rolling around, do your best to try to get the item at the deeper discounted price. If you can, great! Go ahead and return the first item you bought at the higher price. If you didn’t get it, that’s o.k. because you were still able to get the item you wanted, just not at the discounted price.

Free is Always Good
Shipping for many online retailers is free during the holiday season. Some sites have a minimum that you have to purchase to get free shipping; however, many of these sites waive that during the holiday season. Either way, when shopping online, be sure to note how long it will take to deliver the items to ensure you receive them in time for the holidays.

When it comes to online shopping, be aware that not all returns are free. Sometimes you will have to pay the shipping to return an item. However, PayPal is offering free return shipping this holiday season on items that you purchase through your PayPal account.

There’s an App for That
Mobile apps are becoming more and more prominent when it comes to shopping. It is not uncommon for these apps to offer additional discounts or special promotions. Two examples of these are the JC Penney app and the Target Cartwheel app. The Cartwheel app offers weekly discounts in addition to what is offered in their circular. These discounts can also be stacked on additional coupons and sales, giving you even bigger savings. And this year, the JC Penney app is offering an early sneak peek to their Black Friday ad before it is publicly released.

Do Your Homework
From scouring weekly ad circulars to checking your favorite websites for the latest updates on sales, this information is everywhere and easily accessible. Follow your favorite stores on Facebook to keep up with the latest updates. It’s not uncommon for companies to offer additional savings to their social media followers. Other sites that you can use to get coupon codes, sales and deals are FatWallet.com and RetailMeNot.com. Another site that is set up as message boards to discuss current deal and coupon codes is SlickDeals.net. Sometimes sites like these can tip you off to other, lesser-known sales that are happening.

Hopefully this list will help you get you holiday shopping started on the right foot. Good luck and happy shopping!

Teal Pumpkin Project

By Tabitha Surface, CARD Extension Agent

Halloween is fast approaching and more than a few of us are scrambling to prepare the perfect costume. But food allergy parents have something more than last minute costumes to worry about. According to Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE), food allergies affect more than 15 million people in the United States, including 1 out of 13 children. That means if you are handing out candy this year, either at your door or at trunk-or-treat events, you’ll be dishing up treats to at least a few kids that can’t enjoy them.

 

Depending on the severity of the food allergy, parents might let their children trick-or-treat and swap out what has been collected with treats they know are safe for their kids. But, let’s be honest, that’s not nearly as fun as sifting through your take to see what you picked up along your route. Worse, holiday goodie bags or school events celebrated with food may exclude children with allergies. While exclusion is pretty common for a food-allergic child, it can have a negative impact on their self-worth and social-interactions, as well as potentially intensifying food-allergy related anxiety.

 

However, there are easy, inclusive solutions. For school parties, treat bags can be food-free or the parent of a food-allergy child can be consulted; they may be happy to help prepare classroom snacks so all the children have the same experience without putting their child in harm’s way. Always defer to the food-allergic child’s parent on matters of food. Remember, they spend a great deal of time trying to keep their kid safe, and while you may have the best of intentions, it can be very scary to trust a relative stranger with your kids life.

 

It gets even easier when it comes to trick-or-treating. Be a part of FARE’s Teal Pumpkin Project by setting out a teal pumpkin. The teal pumpkin lets families with food-allergic children know that non-food treats will be offered. Even better, this gives kids who don’t have allergies but might have restrictive diets (such as diabetics) a safe option as well. Below is a list of ideas and a couple of great resources to get prepared even so close to Halloween.

 

1. Tattoos (This isn’t a bad idea but keep in mind that some inks are soy based, and soy is one of the top 10 allergens.)

2. Bubbles

3. Fake snakes and spiders

4. Slap Bracelets

5. Fortune Fish

6. Glow sticks/bracelets

 

And where can you get these fun toys? Retailers from the Dollar Tree to Wal-Mart carry inexpensive toys and gift-bag kits, but you can also order in bulk from Oriental Trading or Amazon when time permits.

 

In the Charleston-Huntington area, The Food Allergy Pharmacist partners with Kroger to host a Teal Pumpkin Project inspired trunk-or-treat. However, she takes it one step further and asks that sponsoring trunks offer no food treats at all. West Virginia State University Extension Service is a sponsor of the event. Join us on Saturday, October 29, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Kroger on 7th Ave/1st Street Huntington and from 4 to 6 p.m. at the South Charleston Kroger. There will be lots of non-food goodies, carnival-style games and a dance party. Happy Halloween!

Minimizing the Risk of Home Fires

By Krista Farley Raines, Regional Communications Officer, American Red Cross West Virginia Region

Note: This week, Oct. 9-15, is National Fire Prevention Week, and our friends at the American Red Cross West Virginia Region are here with a guest post about how to minimize the risk of fire in your home and how you can receive a FREE smoke alarm.

Last year in West Virginia, the Red Cross responded to almost 700 home fires. Such fires all too often end in tragedy. Seven times a day, someone in this country dies in a home fire. The Red Cross has been working to reduce that number through the Home Fire Campaign, a multi-year effort to reduce the number of home fire deaths and injuries by 25 percent. Launched in October 2014, the Red Cross and thousands of campaign partners have helped save numerous lives through the effort, as well as installing more than a quarter million free smoke alarms in homes all across the country.

Everyone should take three steps to help minimize their risk:

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of the home, and check them monthly by pressing the test button.
  • Create a fire escape plan identifying two escape routes from every room of the home and a place a short distance outside of the home where family members can meet after escaping.
  • Practice the escape plan at least twice a year, paying particular attention to children or older adults who may require extra time and care.

The Red Cross wants to help you get prepared. Learn how to help prevent a home fire and what to do if one occurs by downloading the Red Cross Emergency App.

Visit redcross.org/homefires to find out more about how to protect yourself and your beloved home from fire.

To have a free smoke alarm installed in your home, find the location of smoke alarm installation events or to become a volunteer, contact the American Red Cross West Virginia Region at (304) 340-3650 or visit www.redcrosswv.org.

Program Spotlight: Healthy Grandfamilies

Did you know West Virginia currently ranks fourth in the nation for grandparents raising grandchildren?

According to 2010 U.S. Census data, more than 40,000 children under the age of 18 in West Virginia are living in homes where the householders are grandparents or other relatives. To help meet the needs of this unique family dynamic, we’re partnering with the WVSU Department of Social Work to launch the new Healthy Grandfamilies initiative. The project is a series of free workshops and follow-up support targeting grandparents who are raising one or more of their grandchildren.

The program consists of nine workshops on the following topics:

  • Parenting in the 21st Century
  • Family Relationships: A new dynamic
  • Communication: When no one talks and everyone texts
  • Technology & Social Media: The dangers, pitfalls & plusses
  • Nutrition: Balancing diets when everyone is “on the go”
  • Legal Issues & Documents: Getting past all the legal issues to learn “who is really in charge”
  • Health Literacy & Self-Care: How to take care of your own health issues in this new family dynamic
  • Healthy Lifestyles & Stress Management: Learn how to manage your stress – and the stress of your grandchildren
  • Negotiating the Public School System: Learn about Parent Teacher Organizations (PTO) and how to help your grandchildren with homework

Participants are provided three months of free follow-up services with a Licensed Social Worker. Such services include assistance with locating community resources, confidential help in meeting unique family needs and advocacy services.

Workshops are slated to begin this spring in the St. Albans area. The initiative will kick off with a meet-and-greet style Open House on Tuesday, April 26, from 3:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at First Baptist Church of St. Albans.

Learn more about the WVSU Healthy Grandfamilies project on our website and Facebook page.

Healthy Grandfamilies is funded by the USDA’s Capacity Building Grants Program, Award No. 2015-38821-24374.

Mentoring in My Community: A Lifetime Commitment, Make a Difference Today

by Kaysha Moreno, Extension Agent

Our youth are faced daily with many challenges from school to raging hormones to peer pressure and life as a whole. “Research shows that mentees usually perform better in their program and after they get out of school, than students without mentors” (W. Brad Johnson, PhD, a psychology professor at the U.S. Naval Academy and author of several books about mentoring.)

Research shows that Students who meet regularly with their mentors are 52% less likely than their peers to skip a day of school and 37% less likely to skip a class.

  • Youth who meet regularly with their mentors are 46% less likely than their peers to start using illegal drugs and 27% less likely to start drinking.
  • Seventy-six percent of at-risk young adults who had a mentor aspire to enroll in and graduate from college versus half of at-risk young adults who had no mentor. They are also more likely to be enrolled in college.
  • Mentoring reduces “depressive symptoms” and increases “social acceptance, academic attitudes and grades.”

Finding a mentor is not always an easy task; many look to peers in their immediate surroundings, but often times they are misguided and usually tend to focus on immediate matters and short-term assignments rather than career goals and how to achieve them. I’m not saying that this is in anyway wrong, but short-term mentoring is usually due to misguided advice given to the mentors or the fact that they have a strong sense of feeling like “I am not mentor material.” So what is mentor material? Being a mentor does not mean you have to know all the answers, and it does not mean that you have to be at the pinnacle of your career. You already have more to offer than you think. Being a mentor requires attentiveness, commitment to meeting with the mentee and sticking with it. You will find that you will get just as much as you give, if not more. If you’re interested in being a mentor, keep these key points in mind:

  • Be open to sharing. Yes, you need to listen, but also be willing to share. Your ups and downs will help your mentee navigate their challenges. There is no perfectly smooth ride in anyone’s career. Be willing to share your mistakes and failures, those are great lessons for your mentee as well.
  • Be Committed. If you are helping someone, you must be committed to doing so and to putting in the time to make the relationship work, for the long term.
  • Have Integrity. You must be respected and respectable to be a good mentor. Be an honest person. It’s the way to be – even if you’re not a mentor!
  • Be engaged. Hey, you can’t be a mentor just because it “sounds” like the right thing to do. Be present in the life of your mentee. This will be a personal relationship with give and take, a lot of listening and a lot of support.

I’ve often advocated learning from successful people in your life or field. Watching how your heroes operate and dissecting how they communicate is a great learning tool and a great way for you to be a better leader yourself. Mentoring is about being transparent and revealing your best self. It’s about finding your best voice and learning what not to share and exactly what to share if you want someone to be just as successful as you, if not better. Meenoo Rami gets it perfect in “Thrive” when she describes her many mentors and how they’ve each played a distinct role in her growth as an educator. In the book, she lists:

  • The mentor who helps me see what’s possible in my practice.
  • The mentor who dares me into new work.
  • The mentor who helps me fine-tune my instruction.
  • The mentor who helps me find community.
  • The mentor who helps me see what’s possible in my writing life.
  • The mentor who helps me share my work publicly.
  • The mentor who helps me stay balanced.

These folks range from her principal, to a highly regarded author for English teachers to in-school colleagues, to her sister. That’s exactly how mentoring works in real life!

Mentoring provides meaningful and necessary connections that impact the people involved in a great way. For those who are being mentored, the impact shows in academics, socially and economically. For those doing the mentoring it can build management skills and leadership skills, it can expand your professional network, and it also provides the great feeling of empowerment by giving back to the community.

There are many ways to get involved and mentor in your community. Here at West Virginia State University Extension Service we are dedicated to the future of our communities. We have many mentoring opportunities from 4-H mentoring, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics), agriculture, etc. If you are interested in being a volunteer for any of these programs, please contact WVSU Extension Service. But your options are not limited to just WVSU. Perform an online search for volunteer opportunities in your area and you will have an array of options like Americorps, Big Brothers Big Sisters, YWCA, and many, many more.

At a time of great social need for our youth, why not be that person that will inspire change and teach life lessons that will help the youth succeed in life.