advice

Turkey Talk: The Ins and Outs

By Bonnie Dunn, Tabitha Surface and Robin Turner, Extension Agents

Thanksgiving is a time for good food and drink with family and friends, but the common centerpiece of the holiday dinner – especially Thanksgiving – is turkey. And while delicious, turkey does have its own set of preparation steps that must be carefully followed to ensure it is cooked appropriately. Here are a few guidelines that will ensure all your guests remain happy and healthy during your “turkey day” festivities.

Thawing: There are a few ways to thaw a turkey, but the best is to thaw it in the refrigerator. This will allow the turkey to thaw at the proper temperature, which also slows the growth of harmful bacteria. If you must use water to thaw your turkey, make sure the water is cold and drain it frequently to maintain the cold temperature.

Next, remember the letters “CSCS!” when the real turkey prep begins: Clean – Separate – Cook – Clean Up.

Clean: Wash hands, utensils, surfaces, and fruits and vegetables. Do not wash the turkey or eggs.

Separate: Keep all the meats separated from other food items by using separate cutting boards, utensils and towels. Wash your hands when switching from one utensil or recipe to another. Keep a sink full of clean, soapy, hot water to wash your hands as you are preparing each recipe. This ensures that no cross contamination occurs.

Cook: Yay! It is time to put the turkey in the oven. Try these helpful hints for a safe, delicious holiday!

  1. For a quick clean-up, purchase a turkey cooking bag at your local grocery store. This not only saves time on cleaning but also makes for a more moist and flavorful dinner.
  2. When stuffing is cooked inside the turkey, it is more moist and flavorful, but it absorbs some of the fat from the bird, so keep that in mind when calculating your caloric intake.
  3. Stuffing can be a source of foodborne illness, especially if placed inside the bird. Make sure all cutting boards, spoons, bowls and hands are very clean when preparing the mixture. Never stuff the bird before you are ready to bake it. Do not pack the cavity tight as the center may stay at the “temperature danger zone” too long.
  4. Baking stuffing separately from the turkey is safer and produces a lower-calorie side dish. If the stuffing is made early in the day, mix it very quickly and place in a prepared baking dish. Cover tightly and refrigerate immediately. When ready to bake, remove it from refrigerator and place directly into the preheated oven. Test to make sure the stuffing has heated all the way through before serving

 Clean up: Do not leave your Thanksgiving dinner out on the table beyond two hours after having taken it from the oven/stovetop to the table.

If you want to cook your turkey unstuffed, add extra flavor by placing the following items in the cavity of the turkey: one celery rib, one onion cut in half, and one whole carrot. Otherwise, try our Healthy Holiday Stuffing recipe below.

 

Healthy Holiday Stuffing:
Serves 8

Ingredients
1/2 cup chopped carrots
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 1/2 cup de-fatted turkey broth or 1 cup low-sodium non-fat chicken broth
1 cup sliced raw mushrooms
1 8-oz. package of seasoned stuffing mix
Non-stick cooking spray

Directions

  1. Wash, peel and finely chop carrots, celery and onion. Place in a medium saucepan with broth and bring to a boil. Cover, turn heat down and simmer for 5 minutes.
  1. Slice mushrooms. Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Remove from heat briefly and spray with non-stick cooking spray. Return to heat and add mushrooms to saute.
  1. Place stuffing mix in large bowl. Add mushrooms and vegetables in broth. Toss lightly with a fork.
  1. Spray baking dish lightly with cooking spray. Spoon stuffing into baking dish. Cover tightly with foil. Bake at 325 degrees.
  1. If you choose to stuff your turkey, be sure to do it loosely.

Nutritional Values
Calories: 120
Sodium: 387 mg
Carbs: 25 g
Protein: 4 g
Fat: 1 g

Exchanges:
1 starch/bread and
1 vegetable

 

For additional information refer to: CDC Thanksgiving Food Safety

 

 

 

Cyber Monday

By Stacy Herrick, Communications Specialist

In our third, and last, installment of “Thrifty Thursdays,” we are going to talk about Cyber Monday shopping tips. The term “Cyber Monday” was coined in 2005 as a reference to the Monday after Thanksgiving, where marketing companies were trying to sway people to shop online. This year, the online shopping event will take place on Monday, November 28. Below are some tips to help you get the most out of your shopping.

Do Your Homework
Most sites will release their ads a few days in advance, so take a look to see who is offering what and make a game plan. Also, let the deal bloggers do the work for you. Find a site or two to browse and you can save yourself tons of time. They will have the latest on promo codes, pricing and even some unadvertised offers.

Plan Ahead
If you know where you are planning to shop ahead of time (which you should, because you already scouted the ads, right?), take a few minutes ahead of time to create a customer account if you don’t already have one. This will save you time during checkout and will help you move on to the next site, and sale, quicker.

Stretch Your Dollar
Everyone loves to get more bang for their buck. One way to do this is to purchase discounted gift cards ahead of time for stores that you plan on shopping at. Another way to do this is to order through a rewards site to earn points or cash back. Or, if you are feeling generous and are shopping on Amazon, use Amazon Smile to have a portion of your purchase donated to a charity of your choice.

Be Quick on the Draw
Some sales only have a limited quantity of items or are only on sale for a certain amount of time. Be aware of this and plan to hit these sales early in day (or whatever time the sale starts) so you don’t miss out. Amazon offers early access to most of its Lightning Deals to Prime Members.

Beware of Shipping
There’s nothing like thinking you’re getting a great deal on your items only to find out when you go to checkout that the shipping is almost as much as your items. Make sure you are aware of the site’s shipping costs before you spend time shopping. There are some sites out there that will gather information for you on who has free shipping (thank you deal bloggers!). Another option to consider is to ship the items directly to the recipient. This will save you from having to travel with additional items. This is an especially good idea if you are flying for the holidays!

Be Safe
As always, when shopping online, make sure your computer is up to date with the latest anti-virus software and is protected from anti-spyware. Shopping on trustworthy sites is always the best way to ensure your personal information will be handled safely. To ensure your online purchase is secure, before paying, look in the address box for the “s” in https:// and in the lower-right corner for the lock symbol. Paying with credit cards or PayPal are often easiest when shopping online because, if something does happen, it is always possible to dispute unauthorized charges.

Hopefully these tips have helped you prepare for your holiday shopping. Good luck out there!

Black Friday 2016

By Stacy Herrick, Communications Specialist

Black Friday has become, in a sense, a holiday of its own. Love it or hate it, one thing is for sure: it is the unofficial kickoff to the holiday season. With sales everywhere you turn, why not take an opportunity to save yourself some cash while buying gifts for your loved ones?

Show Your Loyalty
Joining a store’s loyalty program can get you special deals, sneak peeks, extra coupons or earn you store cash. Make sure you sign up for these loyalty programs before you head out for your Black Friday shopping.

Sign Up Early for Store Emails
Once you know where you plan on shopping, sign up for store emails a couple of weeks in advance (like, now!) to start receiving their special discounts. Often, stores will send a special coupon to customers for signing up to receive their emails. (Don’t forget, you can always unsubscribe from these later if you don’t want to continue getting them.)

Become a Follower
Just like signing up for store emails, another great way to stay up to date with the latest news, products and sales is to follow the company on social media. It is not uncommon for stores to offer exclusive sales to their social media followers, so keep your eyes peeled!

Consider Shopping with Gift Cards
If you know which stores you will be shopping at this holiday season, why not buy gift cards ahead of time to make your purchases with? Depending on where you buy your gift cards, you can rack up fuel rewards or even get them at a discounted price from sites like Raise.com. When combined with Black Friday prices, the savings really add up! (Plus, this will also help you stay within your budget because you’ll be more aware of how much you are spending.)

If you do purchase gift cards to shop with, consider using an app like Gyft so you can leave the bulky cards at home. Gyft not only stores your gift cards on your phone for you, but it also keeps an updated account of what is left on the card as you make your purchases.

Door Busters
Some stores offer guarantees for Door Buster sales during a certain period of time on Black Friday. This means that even though they may have sold out of the actual item, you can purchase a voucher at the advertised price during the block of time and will be able to pick up that item before Christmas once it is in stock again.

Also, it is worth noting that just about all of the sales offered in-store are also offered online, with the exception of Door Busters.

These are just a few shopping tips that I’ve found that help me. Do you have any other tips you’d like to share? If so, comment below! May your cart always be full and your checkout lines be short. Good luck!

Not interested in fighting the crowds on Black Friday? Maybe online shopping in your pajamas is more your speed? Check back next week for Cyber Monday shopping tips.

Teal Pumpkin Project

By Tabitha Surface, CARD Extension Agent

Halloween is fast approaching and more than a few of us are scrambling to prepare the perfect costume. But food allergy parents have something more than last minute costumes to worry about. According to Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE), food allergies affect more than 15 million people in the United States, including 1 out of 13 children. That means if you are handing out candy this year, either at your door or at trunk-or-treat events, you’ll be dishing up treats to at least a few kids that can’t enjoy them.

 

Depending on the severity of the food allergy, parents might let their children trick-or-treat and swap out what has been collected with treats they know are safe for their kids. But, let’s be honest, that’s not nearly as fun as sifting through your take to see what you picked up along your route. Worse, holiday goodie bags or school events celebrated with food may exclude children with allergies. While exclusion is pretty common for a food-allergic child, it can have a negative impact on their self-worth and social-interactions, as well as potentially intensifying food-allergy related anxiety.

 

However, there are easy, inclusive solutions. For school parties, treat bags can be food-free or the parent of a food-allergy child can be consulted; they may be happy to help prepare classroom snacks so all the children have the same experience without putting their child in harm’s way. Always defer to the food-allergic child’s parent on matters of food. Remember, they spend a great deal of time trying to keep their kid safe, and while you may have the best of intentions, it can be very scary to trust a relative stranger with your kids life.

 

It gets even easier when it comes to trick-or-treating. Be a part of FARE’s Teal Pumpkin Project by setting out a teal pumpkin. The teal pumpkin lets families with food-allergic children know that non-food treats will be offered. Even better, this gives kids who don’t have allergies but might have restrictive diets (such as diabetics) a safe option as well. Below is a list of ideas and a couple of great resources to get prepared even so close to Halloween.

 

1. Tattoos (This isn’t a bad idea but keep in mind that some inks are soy based, and soy is one of the top 10 allergens.)

2. Bubbles

3. Fake snakes and spiders

4. Slap Bracelets

5. Fortune Fish

6. Glow sticks/bracelets

 

And where can you get these fun toys? Retailers from the Dollar Tree to Wal-Mart carry inexpensive toys and gift-bag kits, but you can also order in bulk from Oriental Trading or Amazon when time permits.

 

In the Charleston-Huntington area, The Food Allergy Pharmacist partners with Kroger to host a Teal Pumpkin Project inspired trunk-or-treat. However, she takes it one step further and asks that sponsoring trunks offer no food treats at all. West Virginia State University Extension Service is a sponsor of the event. Join us on Saturday, October 29, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Kroger on 7th Ave/1st Street Huntington and from 4 to 6 p.m. at the South Charleston Kroger. There will be lots of non-food goodies, carnival-style games and a dance party. Happy Halloween!

Small Business vs. Entrepreneurship Interview

by Sarah Halstead, CARD Extension Specialist, shalstead@wvstateu.edu

Sarah asked Brenda Pinnel, a WVSU Lean Startup 60X client, to share advice with others who are thinking about starting a small business. Below is an excerpt of the interview.

What ignited the spark in you to start a new business venture? How did the idea for your business come about?
For me, it was more of a long-smoldering ember that several breezes blew back to life. I’ve been doing graphic design work for newspaper for 30 years, and for the most part, enjoyed it. After meeting Charly Hamilton and Bernice Deakins and coming around in my life, I think I decided I wanted to be an artist. I started a notebook of sketches and somehow a whirlwind blew me into Tamarack. And then into [WVSU’s DigiSo business training program] and the Lean Startup 60X program. And I began to think, maybe I can be an artist and make money.

What three pieces of advice would you give to college students who want to become entrepreneurs? Is that advice different for Encore Entrepreneurs 50+?
Follow some kind of passion or dream. I wouldn’t halt a perfectly good career or job prospect unless you do have a passion. If you’re over 50, I’d say, get moving. You never know how much time you have. Listen to people who have gone before, even if you think they are lame. Learn to see what is in front of you for what it is.

If you had the chance to start your career over again, what would you do differently?
Be more proactive. Follow more advice. I have been lucky enough to drift into pretty good situations, even out of college. Sometimes I wonder if I had been more persistent, could I have been a fancy modern Mad Men style executive? If I had followed advice to concentrate on informational graphics would I be renowned or famous? Or unemployed?

I do believe, though, in not having too many regrets or dwelling on what could have been. Maybe I don’t learn any lessons with that philosophy, but I am where I am because I did what I did. And try to be okay with that.

What would you say are the top three skills needed to be a successful entrepreneur?
Not successful yet, but — and this is just for me — I think I will need to be able to manage my own time, do things I’m afraid of or uncomfortable with and be open-minded.

What have been some of your failures, and what have you learned from them?
Hard to say yet what my failures are or aren’t in my HepCatz venture. Right now, a big failure is choosing to play online games rather than pushing on with a Facebook post. Also, not believing in myself. Don’t know what I’ve learned yet. Ask me again in a year.

How long do you stick with an idea before giving up?
Well, so far about six months.

How many hours do you work a day on average?
While I am working full time, about 12 hours, five days a week. But that includes travel time. I work at least a couple of hours on the business nearly every.

Describe/outline your typical day.
Get up, plan what I’m going to do. This is important, because I tend to drift without a plan. At this point, it’s not so critical to get everything done on the list, but I need a guide. I try to get in doing a little artwork. Go to the WVSU Economic Development Center. It’s hard to say. I don’t really have a typical day yet.

How has being an entrepreneur affected your family life?
The cats are ticked. But they’re mollified by the hope of better kibble.

What motivates you?
A desperate, deeply-ingrained need to succeed. And a need to draw, and the pleasure both give me. I also like to please people and make them happy with what I do, and if I’m successful, be able to make the world better in what small ways I can.

Brenda Pinnell is the 2013 Community Newspaper Holdings, Inc., Graphic Designer of the Year and a Tamarack juried artist at Tamarack in Beckley, W.Va.