health

EFNEP Program Helping Recovering Addicts Improve Their Health

By Matt Browning, Director of Communications

A program led by West Virginia State University (WVSU) Extension Service is helping West Virginians struggling with substance use disorders to make smarter, healthier choices on their road to recovery.

An initiative of the USDA, the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) provides instruction on health, nutrition and physical activity but does not traditionally target recovering addicts. With West Virginia being labeled by some as “ground zero for the opioid epidemic,” WVSU is taking a unique approach to help people in need.

“EFNEP wasn’t actually designed to reach this population,” said Tammy Hauldren, a WVSU EFNEP extension associate, “but we have such a need in West Virginia that it only seemed fitting to bring this information to the people we serve.”

While the program traditionally targets low-income families, Hauldren began offering the EFNEP classes at sites such as Recovery Point in Charleston and Huntington to help people in recovery learn the basics of good health and nutrition. Through weekly classes, participants are learning to be more physically active, drink more water and spend wisely at the supermarket.

“Often, our participants know little about grocery shopping and how to spend their money on healthy items in the store, so we cover everything from how to make a list to buying lean protein and making three healthy meals from it,” Hauldren said.

Such information is proving invaluable, as Hauldren has seen firsthand.

“You have given me inspiration and support and some valuable classes in a short time,” said Craig Rhodes, a recent participant in one of Hauldren’s classes. After completing treatment, Rhodes has transitioned into being a full-time caregiver for his two grandchildren. “What I learned from your class has really helped me. I never would’ve dreamed I would be raising these children alone.”

Lessons on health-conscious spending, proper nutrition and serving sizes are supplemented with physical activity to get participants moving.

“In Huntington, for instance, we’ll go to Ritter Park and walk or jog three to four miles,” Hauldren said. “Many participants smoke and drink lots of soda, so while I’m with them, there is none of that. One of the first things I cover is the benefit of replacing sugary sodas and energy drinks with water.”

Another first, she said, is building trust. While EFNEP requires six lessons for each course, Hauldren has expanded that to 10 to help establish and nurture a relationship with participants.

“You have to build a relationship and let participants know you’re there to help, to sow seeds of hope as they move through their recovery process,” she said. “So those first couple of lessons, especially, are about building trust as we ease into the core of the program.”

The approach is paying off, as Hauldren has seen participants learn and benefit from making healthy choices by the end of her time with them.

“I had one man say to me, ‘Ms. Tammy, I’ve been shooting up heroin for 16 years. Why should I care about what I’m going to eat now?’’’ she said. “What I try to impart onto them is that what you eat has everything to do with your recovery.”

Hauldren is thankful, she said, because the need for programming like EFNEP is so great in West Virginia. The state has one of the nation’s highest rates of deaths from drug overdoses. As people move into recovery from addiction, understanding how nutrition and physical activity play a role in that process is vital.

Hauldren maintains a growing waiting list of organizations wanting EFNEP. In addition to Recovery Point Charleston and Huntington, she has brought EFNEP to such sites as Putnam County Drug Court and the Pregnancy Connections program at Thomas Memorial Hospital. She will soon begin offering courses at a site in Wayne County.

Developed by the USDA in 1969, EFNEP has successfully addressed critical societal concerns by employing paraprofessional staff and influencing nutrition and physical activity behaviors of low-income families, particularly those with young children. Through a community-based, relationship-driven, hands-on educational approach, EFNEP has directly impacted economic obesity and food insecurity challenges that hinder the health and wellbeing of the nation.

To learn more, contact Hauldren at (304) 552-0075 or hauldrta@wvstateu.edu.

Warm Up with this Tomato Soup Recipe

By Alex Phares, EFNEP Extension Associate

Summer seemed to hang on well into the fall months this year, but by December winter temps finally hit the Mountain State and early January is bringing about our first accumulating snow. It’s the perfect time of year to warm yourself with a hot bowl of homemade soup, and one of my favorites is good ol’ tomato soup.

This recipe is adapted from the Runner’s World Cook Book 2013 and is a healthy, delicious remake of classic tomato soup that adds chickpeas. Chickpeas are a great source of fiber and protein, and tomatoes are full of cancer-fighting antioxidants. To round out the meal, try topping with a tablespoon of cheese and serve with a side salad.

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 can (28 ounces) fire-roasted crushed tomatoes
2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 can (15 ounces) chickpeas

  1. Heat the oil in a large soup pot over medium heat.
  2. Add the onion and cook until soft, around 4 minutes (stirring frequently).
  3. Add the garlic and cook for about 30 seconds.
  4. Add the tomatoes and broth, raise heat and bring to a boil.
  5. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 5 minutes. Add sugar and black pepper.
  6. Add the chickpeas and simmer for 10 minutes.
  7. Carefully transfer to a blender (work in small batches, or the steam will build up in the blender. Only fill 1/2 – 2/3 of the way full).
  8. Blend ½ of the soup until mostly smooth, you may see bits of tomato and chickpea.
  9. Return to remaining soup in the pot and serve.

Turkey Talk: The Ins and Outs

By Bonnie Dunn, Tabitha Surface and Robin Turner, Extension Agents

Thanksgiving is a time for good food and drink with family and friends, but the common centerpiece of the holiday dinner – especially Thanksgiving – is turkey. And while delicious, turkey does have its own set of preparation steps that must be carefully followed to ensure it is cooked appropriately. Here are a few guidelines that will ensure all your guests remain happy and healthy during your “turkey day” festivities.

Thawing: There are a few ways to thaw a turkey, but the best is to thaw it in the refrigerator. This will allow the turkey to thaw at the proper temperature, which also slows the growth of harmful bacteria. If you must use water to thaw your turkey, make sure the water is cold and drain it frequently to maintain the cold temperature.

Next, remember the letters “CSCS!” when the real turkey prep begins: Clean – Separate – Cook – Clean Up.

Clean: Wash hands, utensils, surfaces, and fruits and vegetables. Do not wash the turkey or eggs.

Separate: Keep all the meats separated from other food items by using separate cutting boards, utensils and towels. Wash your hands when switching from one utensil or recipe to another. Keep a sink full of clean, soapy, hot water to wash your hands as you are preparing each recipe. This ensures that no cross contamination occurs.

Cook: Yay! It is time to put the turkey in the oven. Try these helpful hints for a safe, delicious holiday!

  1. For a quick clean-up, purchase a turkey cooking bag at your local grocery store. This not only saves time on cleaning but also makes for a more moist and flavorful dinner.
  2. When stuffing is cooked inside the turkey, it is more moist and flavorful, but it absorbs some of the fat from the bird, so keep that in mind when calculating your caloric intake.
  3. Stuffing can be a source of foodborne illness, especially if placed inside the bird. Make sure all cutting boards, spoons, bowls and hands are very clean when preparing the mixture. Never stuff the bird before you are ready to bake it. Do not pack the cavity tight as the center may stay at the “temperature danger zone” too long.
  4. Baking stuffing separately from the turkey is safer and produces a lower-calorie side dish. If the stuffing is made early in the day, mix it very quickly and place in a prepared baking dish. Cover tightly and refrigerate immediately. When ready to bake, remove it from refrigerator and place directly into the preheated oven. Test to make sure the stuffing has heated all the way through before serving

 Clean up: Do not leave your Thanksgiving dinner out on the table beyond two hours after having taken it from the oven/stovetop to the table.

If you want to cook your turkey unstuffed, add extra flavor by placing the following items in the cavity of the turkey: one celery rib, one onion cut in half, and one whole carrot. Otherwise, try our Healthy Holiday Stuffing recipe below.

 

Healthy Holiday Stuffing:
Serves 8

Ingredients
1/2 cup chopped carrots
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 1/2 cup de-fatted turkey broth or 1 cup low-sodium non-fat chicken broth
1 cup sliced raw mushrooms
1 8-oz. package of seasoned stuffing mix
Non-stick cooking spray

Directions

  1. Wash, peel and finely chop carrots, celery and onion. Place in a medium saucepan with broth and bring to a boil. Cover, turn heat down and simmer for 5 minutes.
  1. Slice mushrooms. Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Remove from heat briefly and spray with non-stick cooking spray. Return to heat and add mushrooms to saute.
  1. Place stuffing mix in large bowl. Add mushrooms and vegetables in broth. Toss lightly with a fork.
  1. Spray baking dish lightly with cooking spray. Spoon stuffing into baking dish. Cover tightly with foil. Bake at 325 degrees.
  1. If you choose to stuff your turkey, be sure to do it loosely.

Nutritional Values
Calories: 120
Sodium: 387 mg
Carbs: 25 g
Protein: 4 g
Fat: 1 g

Exchanges:
1 starch/bread and
1 vegetable

 

For additional information refer to: CDC Thanksgiving Food Safety

 

 

 

Nov. 17: Annual Take a Hike Day

By Ray Moeller, CARD Extension Agent

This Thursday, Nov. 17, marks national “Take a Hike” Day. Below are two not-so-well-known hikes that I often enjoy in southern West Virginia.

Long Point on Summersville Lake
This trail meanders through mature forest growth, leading to a rock outcropping that is 40 feet high at a sharp bend in the Gauley River, which becomes part of Summersville Lake during the summer months. The hike is between one and one-half miles and two miles one-way and there are several off trail options. There is little chance of becoming turned around as the hike traverses a point which is defined on both sides by Summersville Lake itself. To find the trail, drive on U.S. Route 19 south of Summersville and turn west onto Airport Road, which leads to the marina and Mountain Lake Campground. Drive on Airport Road past the marina road, the campground store and the airport. When you come to a gate, park along the roadway and follow the two tracks to the trail signs. The view from the point is terrific, just be aware that children will require careful oversight as there are no hand rails or fencing.

The Falls of Hills Creek
This trail is a hidden gem in the Gauley District of the Monongahela National Forest. Travel east out of Richwood on Highway 55/39 for approximately 20 miles to the marked parking area at the Falls of Hills Creek. The trail leads alongside three falls that are increasing in height. Be warned that the trail is downhill to the last of the falls with many stairs to negotiate. Thus the hiker will be required to return uphill along the same stairs and incline. The falls are particularly beautiful in times of more significant rainfall, especially in the spring of the year, when flowers brighten the landscape and the new growth allows for enhanced sight lines. The total distance is approximately three-quarters of a mile one way, of which the first 1,700 feet paved, with the remainder of the trail more strenuous.

 

Teal Pumpkin Project

By Tabitha Surface, CARD Extension Agent

Halloween is fast approaching and more than a few of us are scrambling to prepare the perfect costume. But food allergy parents have something more than last minute costumes to worry about. According to Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE), food allergies affect more than 15 million people in the United States, including 1 out of 13 children. That means if you are handing out candy this year, either at your door or at trunk-or-treat events, you’ll be dishing up treats to at least a few kids that can’t enjoy them.

 

Depending on the severity of the food allergy, parents might let their children trick-or-treat and swap out what has been collected with treats they know are safe for their kids. But, let’s be honest, that’s not nearly as fun as sifting through your take to see what you picked up along your route. Worse, holiday goodie bags or school events celebrated with food may exclude children with allergies. While exclusion is pretty common for a food-allergic child, it can have a negative impact on their self-worth and social-interactions, as well as potentially intensifying food-allergy related anxiety.

 

However, there are easy, inclusive solutions. For school parties, treat bags can be food-free or the parent of a food-allergy child can be consulted; they may be happy to help prepare classroom snacks so all the children have the same experience without putting their child in harm’s way. Always defer to the food-allergic child’s parent on matters of food. Remember, they spend a great deal of time trying to keep their kid safe, and while you may have the best of intentions, it can be very scary to trust a relative stranger with your kids life.

 

It gets even easier when it comes to trick-or-treating. Be a part of FARE’s Teal Pumpkin Project by setting out a teal pumpkin. The teal pumpkin lets families with food-allergic children know that non-food treats will be offered. Even better, this gives kids who don’t have allergies but might have restrictive diets (such as diabetics) a safe option as well. Below is a list of ideas and a couple of great resources to get prepared even so close to Halloween.

 

1. Tattoos (This isn’t a bad idea but keep in mind that some inks are soy based, and soy is one of the top 10 allergens.)

2. Bubbles

3. Fake snakes and spiders

4. Slap Bracelets

5. Fortune Fish

6. Glow sticks/bracelets

 

And where can you get these fun toys? Retailers from the Dollar Tree to Wal-Mart carry inexpensive toys and gift-bag kits, but you can also order in bulk from Oriental Trading or Amazon when time permits.

 

In the Charleston-Huntington area, The Food Allergy Pharmacist partners with Kroger to host a Teal Pumpkin Project inspired trunk-or-treat. However, she takes it one step further and asks that sponsoring trunks offer no food treats at all. West Virginia State University Extension Service is a sponsor of the event. Join us on Saturday, October 29, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Kroger on 7th Ave/1st Street Huntington and from 4 to 6 p.m. at the South Charleston Kroger. There will be lots of non-food goodies, carnival-style games and a dance party. Happy Halloween!

Wild, Wonderful (and Cheap!) WV Outdoor Adventures

By Chris Zeto, Extension Agent

West Virginia is widely known for its many “Wild, Wonderful” outdoor adventures. Since spring has officially sprung, it’s time to get outside and have some fun. Whether you are interested in taking a leisurely stroll through one of the many state parks or hitting some challenging off-road ATV trails, West Virginia has something for everyone. Listed below are some free or inexpensive outdoor adventures that are a must for 2016:

groupride
For more information on these and other outdoor adventures, please visit GoToWV.com or call 1-800-CALL-WVA. Go outside and play in Wild, Wonderful West Virginia.

Post Harvest Techniques for the Consumer

by Robin Turner, Extension Agent

Purchasing fresh fruits and vegetables from your local farmers market or grocery store is a great way to ensure a healthy diet. But, do you ever wish you could keep those items fresh longer? Let’s look at some post-harvest storage tips to maintain a longer life for your fresh produce.

“Post-harvest” is defined as the handling of fresh produce from the point of harvest to when the product reaches the end user. Quality of fresh produce can never be regained after it is lost. Every fruit and vegetable has its own set of storage conditions that is temperature and moisture (humidity) dependent. With proper harvesting, pre-cooling and storage techniques, fresh produce can be stored to its maximum time. Following proven post-harvest techniques will slow softening (over-ripening), wilting, decay and odors.

The following chart, adapted from Storing Fresh Vegetables for Better Taste, lists appropriate storage temperatures for a variety of fruits and vegetables.

ColdStorageChart

It is important to remember to refrigerate your fresh produce once it is cut or peeled for safety reasons. Produce should be stored in a moisture-resistant bag with air holes; this will prevent condensation, allow airflow and retain humidity. Remember to wash produce with clean running water before consuming, even when peeling. This will ensure that dirt from the outside does not transfer to the inside.

Heart-Healthy Snacking

By Stacy Herrick, Communications Specialist

February is American Heart Month. This annual campaign is designed to bring awareness to cardiovascular disease, the nation’s number one killer among both men and women. One way to combat this disease is by maintaining a healthy diet.

With the Super Bowl this weekend, we know that eating healthy is easier said than done. But, have no fear! WVSU Extension Service is here to help you find heart-healthy snacks for the big game. This recipe for sweet potato nachos from the American Heart Association will get everyone cheering.

Ingredients

  • 3 medium sweet potatoes (about 2 pounds), makes about 6 cups of rounds
  • 1 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. chili powder
  • 1 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp. paprika
  • 1/3 cup black beans, drained, rinsed
  • 1/3 cup reduced-fat shredded cheddar cheese
  • 1/3 cup chopped tomato (1 plum tomato) OR
  • 1/3 cup no-salt-added, canned, diced tomatoes, drained and rinsed
  • 1/3 cup chopped avocado

Directions

For more information about American Heart Month and the American Heart Association, visit heart.org. To find more heart-healthy recipes, check out the AHA here.

Preparing Your Vehicle for Winter

By Krista Farley Raines, Regional Communications & Marketing Director, American Red Cross – West Virginia Region

Winter weather has finally arrived in the Mountain State, blanketing the region in beautiful – but potentially hazardous – snow. To help you better prepare yourself for winter emergencies, our friends from the American Red Cross West Virginia Region are guest blogging a two-part series about winter weather safety procedures for your home and your car.

Winter storms and cold temperatures can be hazardous, but if you plan ahead, you can keep your family safe. Minimize travel outdoors, but if you have to go out dress in several layers of lightweight clothing, wear mittens and a hat that covers your ears. Don’t forget to leave water running to help prevent pipes from freezing when you leave your house.

If you have to travel, having a preparedness kit in your vehicle at all times is essential. A Vehicle Winter Preparedness Kit should include:

  • Flashlight with extra batteries
  • Cell phone car charger
  • Blanket and/or emergency mylar blanket
  • Fleece hat, gloves, scarf
  • Flares
  • Folding shovel
  • Sand or cat Litter
  • Ice scraper and snow brush
  • First-aid kit
  • Small battery-operated radio
  • Emergency contact card with names and phone numbers
  • Extra prescription medications
  • Bottled water
  • High protein snacks
  • Maps
  • Whistle

If driving is unavoidable, safety should be your number one priority. Make sure your vehicle has plenty of gas, and pay attention to the weather forecast for your travel route and destination. Buckle up, be alert and drive slowly with caution. In the event your vehicle becomes disabled, keep the car running, make sure the exhaust pipe is clear and leave the window open a crack until help arrives. Additionally, know the differences between winter storm outlooks, advisories, watches and warnings.

To learn more about to prepare for, respond to and recover from a disaster, visit redcross.orgAnd don’t miss our first post on winter safety for your home.

Keeping Safe in the Winter Months

By Krista Farley Raines, Regional Communications & Marketing Director, American Red Cross – West Virginia Region

Winter weather has finally arrived in the Mountain State, blanketing the region in beautiful – but potentially hazardous – snow. To help you better prepare yourself for winter emergencies, our friends from the American Red Cross West Virginia Region are guest blogging a two-part series about winter weather safety procedures for your home and your car. (Part two will post later this week.)

The American Red Cross responds to nearly 70,000 disasters every year in this country. No one hears about the vast majority of these emergencies — the home fires that affect a single family, many of whom escape with only the clothes on their backs. Heating sources are the second leading cause of home fire deaths, and fatal home fires increase during the winter months. In addition, the National Fire Protection Association states that half of all home heating fires occur in December, January and February.

Here are some ways you can stay safe during this winter season:

  1. Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, inside bedrooms and outside sleeping areas.
  2. Test the batteries in your smoke alarms once a month, and change them if they’re not working.
  3. Create an escape plan that includes two exits from each room and practice it until everyone in your household can get out in less than two minutes.
  4. Follow the “three feet” rule and keep children, pets and flammable items at least three feet from heating equipment. Turn off portable space heaters when you leave the room and when you go to sleep.
  5. Use gas wisely and never use a cooking range or oven to heat your home. Four percent of Americans admit to having used a gas stove to heat their home.
  6. If using a fireplace, use a glass or metal fire screen large enough to catch sparks and rolling logs.
  7. Never use a generator indoors, even in a garage, carport, basement or crawlspace. Fumes from the generator can be deadly.

If you would like the Red Cross to install free smoke alarms in your home and assist in developing a fire escape plan please call 1-844-216-8286 to schedule an appointment. To learn more about winter safety, visit redcross.org.